What Sized Bike Should I Get?

Sizing bikes can occasionally be a hassle. Even finding a bike size chart that fits all is difficult. Because not all bikes and riders have the same measurements, there isn't always one standard system. Manufacturers indicate size in different ways, depending on the type of bike you want.

We've put together a useful guide on bike sizes that makes choosing the proper size simpler. You may discover useful information about bike sizing and how to choose the right fit for men, women, and children below. The ideal approach to getting the best fit is always to consult a bike shop, however, this article will give you a decent notion of where you sit.

What Sized Bike Should I Get?

Generally, the seat tube length comes in handy while calculating the bike size chart. It runs from the center of the bottom bracket to the seat tube. However, this could differ somewhat from one manufacturer to the next. Some companies measure the frame from the middle of the top tube. More challenges arise because some top tubes are horizontal while others are not. As the frame size (based on height) increases, the length will likewise grow. Although the length will also vary according to the brand or manufacturer.

The top tube length is an essential but sometimes disregarded measurement. You may have long legs and a small torso (or vice versa). So you've to lean too much into the handlebars and put undue strain on your neck, shoulders, and lower back. Besides, bike frames vary depending on the manufacturer. So you might find the frame size of one manufacturer to be more comfortable than that of another. To determine what you need, try a few.

In the next segment, we describe how to measure your body to find the perfect bike size. Check that for a better understanding.

The sizes of typical bicycles vary. The size guidelines and actual sizes vary according to the type of bike.

Road bikes are available in basic small, medium, and large sizes and number sizes. Yet, not all number sizes are uniform between brands. A size 48 on a Specialized bike might not be the same as a 48 on a Trek bike, for instance. You'll be fine if you determine your size and stick to one brand.

Mountain bikes are unique. They also come in S, M, and L sizes, but the sizes vary greatly between brands.

The sizing of hybrid bikes generally combines elements of a mountain bike and road cycle sizing. You can choose folding bikes if you struggle with space in your flat.

 Take Your Measurements for The Perfect Bike Size

For standover height, the bike size chart adds a few inches. It is the distance, measured directly in front of the seat, between the top tube of the bicycle frame and the ground. In this position, you should be straddling the frame with your feet flat on the floor. Road bike frames often have 1-2 inches added to their height. While mountain and commuter bike frames have 2-4 inches added to their height.

It's simpler to determine the appropriate bike size for you than correctly adjusting a bike helmet. Use a tape measure to calculate your size:

  • Inseam: from your crotch to your foot

  • Torso: from your crotch to your sternum - V-shaped indentation at the base of your throat.

Arm: from the tip of your collarbone to the middle of your closed fist, where you would grip the handlebars.

Calculate The Size According to The Chart

Choose the type of bikes you want first. There are numerous variations of bicycles. For instance, you've determined that a mountain bike is what you desire. Now, take your size using the method described above.

You may now use your calculator to determine the appropriate size:

City bike: Leg inseam (cm) x 0,685 = Your frame size

Mountain bike:  Leg inseam (cm) x 0,66 = Your frame size

Road bike: Leg inseam (cm) x 0,70 = Your frame size

Suppose, your leg inseam is 76 cm. Since you want a mountain bike, the proper size will be 50 cm (20"). Similarly, your road bike size is 53 cm, and your city bike size is 52 cm.

The appropriate length of your bike's top tube will depend on your torso and your arms. Because a longer or shorter top tube may affect comfort. Use this straightforward calculation to determine top-tube length:

(Torso length + arm length)/ 2 – 6 = top tube length

Bike Wheel Size for Different Age

Different age groups require different bike frame size and bike wheel size for height. If you want to surprise your little one with a bike, you now even don’t have let him know beforehand, just measure your kid’s height and match with our chart of bike wheel size for height!

Perfect Bike Wheel Size for Kids

When your child wants to ride a bike, a bike wheel size chart is essential. A bike that is too small for your child might be dangerous and damage their riding experience. A child's first biking experience may be ruined if their bike is too big or too tiny, and accidents may result. We're talking about the various bike wheel sizes here.

A child can begin riding a bike at a variety of ages. Some kids learn to balance more quickly than others. But the sooner your kid learns to ride a bike, the faster they'll gain the abilities required to cycle independently.

Children can often begin riding a bike between the ages of 3 and 8 years old. They'll gain confidence as they spend more time on two wheels and eventually be able to cycle without stabilizers or other support.

The wheel diameter of children's bikes determines their "size." The smallest pedal cycles have 12-inch wheels, whereas larger bikes have wheels as large as 24-inches. Although some bike manufacturers produce smaller "youth" size 26′′ bikes, when your child is ready for 26′′, they are typically ready for an adult size ride.

12-inch Wheels

These are the small push bikes that gained popularity in Scandinavia. They typically don't have pedals, which enable kids to develop balance and propel the bike forward with their force.

There are many different types of balance bikes available, but we'd suggest one with a metal frame and pneumatic tires. The balancing bikes made of laminated wood do not hold up well when frequently exposed to cold or damp conditions.

14-inch Wheels

It's time for your youngster to go from a balanced bike to a bike with appropriate pedals once they've mastered one.

Younger children's pedal cycles often have 14- or 16-inch wheels and can be quite heavy for their size. Your kid should be able to transition to pedal cycles without training wheels if they have mastered the art of balancing while cruising along on a balance bike.

This size of child bike must have a pedal brake according to US law. However, rim brake bikes are available in Australia and the UK.

20-inch Wheels

Your child's transition to a 20-inch bike is probably going to be their first experience with gears. Typically, 20-inch bikes have one chainring up front and a few gears are shifted using a twist-style shifter in the back.

Although most bikes have front and back brakes, this is the first kids' size bike in the US with a rear rim brake.

24-inch Wheels

A flexible 24-in wheel bike travels farther and absorbs bumps better than a 20-in wheel bike. You suddenly start counting rides in miles rather than in minutes.

Around this wheel size, bikes start to become more serious. As with other children's bikes, check that the cranks, grips, brake levers, and handlebars are the right size.

26-inch Wheels

It also serves as the last stepping stone before full-sized bikes, which use wheels of the original mountain bike size. This category includes road and mountain bike models that use smaller 11, 14, and 15in frames.

They are essentially miniature copies of adult motorcycles, and they are almost as quick and useful. When you get to 26in wheels, you have a lot of aesthetic and price options.

650b / 700C / 29inch Wheels

Larger youngsters or those who are taller may be able to use these wheels if their frames are the appropriate size.

Between 26 and 29 inches, the 650b mountain bike wheel size is frequently (but incorrectly) referred to as 27.5 inches. Road bike sizes come in 700c and 29in varieties.

Kid’s Bike Size Chart According to Inseam/ Height

When it comes to kid's bikes, there are two techniques. Based on your height and inseam measurements, you can select a bicycle. Alternatively, you might look for a bike appropriate for your child's age. The most precise method, in our opinion, is using a bike size chart by height.

First, use the techniques listed above to gauge your child's height and inseam. Following the measurement of your child's height and inseam, you can use the table below to determine which bike size is most appropriate.

Rider Height

Inseam (Inches)

Suggested Kids Bike Wheel Size

2'10" - 3'4"

86cm - 101cm

14" - 17"

35cm - 42cm

12" Wheels

3'1" - 3'7"

94cm - 109cm

16" - 20"

40cm - 50cm

14" Wheels

3'7" - 4'0"

109cm - 122cm

18" - 22"

45cm - 55cm

16" Wheels

3'9" - 4'3"

114cm - 130cm

20" - 24"

50cm - 60cm

18" Wheels

4'3" - 4'5"

122cm - 135cm

22" - 25"

55cm - 63cm

20" Wheels

4'5" - 4'9"

135cm - 145cm

24" - 28"

60cm - 72cm

24" Wheels

>4'9"

>145cm

>28"

>72cm

26", 27.5" & 700c Wheels (adult bikes)

Assume you choose the ideal size bike for your child using the kid's bike size charts above. Don't be alarmed if their height and inseam fall between the two groups.

The bigger of the two sizes is your best bet. The larger bike won't be uncomfortable for children because they can utilize either size as they grow into it.

Size Chart by Age for Bikes

You can use the child's age if you're buying a bicycle for them but don't have access to their measurements.

It is crucial to remember that this method is not the most precise one. Only the average child's height is used to determine bike size by age.

Your youngster would likely need a different wheel size if they are significantly taller than other children their age.

Nevertheless, considering the average height in the USA and the UK, the following tables show the ideal wheel size for boys and girls by age.

Rider Age

Avg. Height (Boys)

Avg. Height (Girls)

Suggested Bike WheelSize

2 years old

34.2"

33.7"

12 inch wheels

3 years old

37.5"

37"

12 inch wheels

4 years old

40.3"

39.5"

12 inch wheels

5 years old

43.0"

42.5"

14 to 16" wheels

6 years old

45.5"

45.5"

14 to 16" wheels

7 years old

48.0"

47.7"

18 to 20" wheels

8 years old

50.4"

50.5"

18 to 20" wheels

9 years old

52.5"

52.5"

18 to 20" wheels

10 years old

54.5"

54.5"

24" wheels

11 years old

56.5"

56.7"

24" wheels

12 years old

58.7"

59"

26", 27.5" & 700c Wheels (adult bikes)

Sizing Chart for Teenages

It is exactly the same to measure a bike for a teenager as it is for a youngster.

Find the column in one of the bike size charts that corresponds most closely to your teen's height if they aren't typical height.

However, as you can see from the table below, anyone who is taller than 57" (145 cm) is now capable of riding an adult bike with full-size wheels.

Rider Age

Rider Height

Suggested Teen Bike Wheel Size

13 years old

61.5"

26", 27.5" & 700c Wheels (adult bikes)

14 years old

64.5"

26", 27.5" & 700c Wheels (adult bikes)

15 years old

67.0"

26", 27.5" & 700c Wheels (adult bikes)

16 years old

68.3"

26", 27.5" & 700c Wheels (adult bikes)

17 years old

69.0"

26", 27.5" & 700c Wheels (adult bikes)

18 years old

69.2"

26", 27.5" & 700c Wheels (adult bikes)

19 years old

>69.2"

26", 27.5" & 700c Wheels (adult bikes)

Adult Mountain Bike Sizing Chart

Consult a skilled rider for advice on bike fit. Even if their figures on paper appear to be nearly identical, they will tell you that every bike feels and rides differently.

A bike size chart can help you to understand different bike sizing. But mountain bike frame sizes stated by manufacturers might be perplexing. Listing the seat tube length is the conventional approach. Even that, though, varies since some people measure to the middle of the point where the top tube joins the seat tube while others measure to the top of the seat tube.

The most common bike sizes listed by manufacturers are S, M, and L, often with an XS or XL at either end.

We always advise consulting the size charts provided by the manufacturers. The recommended height range for each bike frame size is typically included in these charts. But first, some general rules:

Rider Height (Men)

Suggested Frame Size

Feet and Inches

Centimeters

Size

Inches

4' 10" - 5' 2"

148 - 158

XS

13 - 14

5' 2" - 5 '6"

158 - 168

S

15 - 16

5' '6" - 5' 10"

168 - 178

M

17 - 18

5' 10" - 6' 1"

178 - 185

L

19 - 20

6' 1" - 6' 4"

185 - 193

XL

21 - 22

6 '4" - 6' 6"

193 - 198

XXL

23 - 24

It's crucial to remember that women don't necessarily need to ride bikes designed for them. However, these mountain bikes made specifically for women have parts. These are more comfortable and well-fitting for women. You can anticipate the same performance as the other models excepting those minor changes.

Rider Height (Women)

Suggested Frame Size

Feet and Inches

Centimeters

Size

Inches

4' 10" - 5' 2"

148 - 158

XS

13 - 14

5' 2" - 5 '6"

158 - 168

S

15 -16

5' 6" - 5' 10"

168 - 178

M

17 - 18

5' 10" - 6' 1"

178 - 185

L

19+

Road Bike Sizing Chart

For a general idea of what frame size to use, refer to the bike size chart by height below. We want to stress once more that this is only a guide and is only meant to be a starting point. If you're unsure, get further information from your neighborhood bike shop.

Additionally, keep in mind that sizing charts can differ from one manufacturer to the next. So that you may better comprehend, you can examine their guidelines.

Rider Height (Men)

Suggested Frame Size

Feet and Inches

Centimeters

Size

Centimeters

4' 10" - 5 '0"

148 - 152

XXS

47 - 48

5' 0 "- 5' 3"

152 - 160

XS

49 - 50

5' 3" - 5' 6"

160 - 168

S

51 - 52 - 53

5 6" - 5' 9"

168 - 175

M

54 - 55

5' 9" - 6' 0"

175 - 183

L

56 - 57 - 58

6' 0" - 6' 3"

183 - 191

XL

58 - 59 - 60

6' 3" - 6' 6"

191 - 198

XXL

61 - 62 - 63

As we have stated, women can ride any bike that fits them. Women-specific models, on the other hand, often include improved components that are more comfortable and offer a better fit.

Rider Height (Women)

Suggested Frame Size

Feet and Inches

Centimeters

Size

Centimeters

4' 10" - 5' 1"

147 - 155

XXS

44 - 45 -46

5' 1" - 5' 3"

155 - 160

XS

47 - 48 - 49

5' 3" - 5' 5"

160 - 165

S

50 - 51 -52

5' 5" - 5' 8"

165 - 172

M

53 - 54 -55

5' 8" - 5' 10"

172 - 180

L

56 - 57

Best Sizing Chart for Fitness/Hybreed Bikes

Let's examine the variations before moving on to the hybrid and fitness bike size chart by height.

All types of riding benefit greatly from hybrid bicycles. They are usually more upright and comfortable than road and fitness bikes, making them ideal for commuting and getting around town. Typically, they have tires that are suitable for both paved surfaces and tightly packed dirt roads.

Fitness bikes are simply flat bar road bicycles designed for speed and lightness. They are ideal for working out because they often have thinner tires for better speed. Despite this, you can still utilize them for a reliable commute.

Rider Height

Suggested Frame Size

Feet and Inches

Centimeters

Size

Inches

Centimeters

4' 10" - 5' 1"

147 - 155

XS

13 - 14

47 - 49

5' 1" - 5' 5"

155 - 165

S

15 - 16

50 - 52

5' 5" - 5' 9"

165 - 175

M

17 - 18

53 - 54

5' 9" - 6' 0"

175 - 183

L

19 - 20

55 - 57

6' 0" - 6' 3"

183 - 191

XL

21 - 22

58 - 61

6' 3" - 6' 6"

191 - 198

XXL

23 - 25

61 - 63

Best Sizing Chart for Choosing Your First BMX Bike

Unfortunately, none of the above-mentioned statements are accurate for BMXs. The traditional methods don't apply to BMX bikes because they have smaller frames than other kinds.

The best approach to a BMX bike for children and adults is to use the bike size chart below.

Rider Height

Suggested BMX Bike Frame Size

<4'

<122cm

Micro-Mini

15" - 16"

4' - 4'6"

122cm - 142cm

Mini

16" - 17"

4'4"- 4'10"

137cm - 149cm

Junior

17" - 18.5"

4'8" - 5'4"

147cm - 163cm

Expert

18.5" - 19.5"

5'4" - 5'10"

163cm - 181cm

Pro

20" - 20.5"

>5'10"

>181cm

Pro-XL & Pro-XXL

>20.5"

How to Check the Right Bike Size

Imagine that you are in front of a bike that you are considering purchasing. All of the bike sizing charts indicate that it should fit very well. But how can you be certain? What happens if you're just on the cusp of two sizes? Continue reading to discover some of the most crucial factors while seeking the ideal fit.

Standover Height

The height at which you stand over the bar is known as the standover height. It is effectively the space between the top tube and the ground. When you get off the seat, you'll need some space between your crotch and the bar. Experts suggest an inch of standover space for a comfortable fit on most bikes. By raising the bike till it contacts your body while you're standing, you may quickly verify this. You should have plenty of room if you can raise the wheels by at least an inch.

Leg Extension

Once you've confirmed that you have enough standover space, check to see if your legs are extended sufficiently. You can adjust the seat height to find the perfect fit, but if your legs are still significantly bent while you pedal after raising the seat post to its highest setting, you may require a larger size.

Here's how to extend your legs properly:

You should be able to bend your knee about 15-20° on the downstroke, or when the pedal is closest to the ground. Depending on the individual, you may wish to bend your knees more or less, but you should try to keep them from rising too much while you pedal, as this is uncomfortable, ineffective, and harmful for your joints.

Put your foot on the pedal and test your leg extension by seeing if you can lower your heel below the pedal's axle on the downstroke. The most effective and comfortable position is frequently achieved by pushing your heel slightly past the axle.

Reach

Reach is just how it sounds. Particularly, the horizontal distance between the bottom bracket and the head tube is the official reach measurement. It translates more broadly to how far you must extend to grasp the handlebars.

When as an experienced rider, you're in the middle of two sizes, reach is something to think about most. When choosing a bike for challenging terrain, one with a longer reach will feel "roomier," more stable at speed, and generally more confident. The bike will feel more responsive with a shorter reach. But depending on your riding style, it may or may not be what you're looking for.

If you're riding a bike, should your feet be on the ground?

When seated on the seat, you should be able to touch your toes to the floor. However, if you can place your feet flat on the floor, your seat height is likely too low. Your knees will be too bent while pedaling if your seat is too low. It may result in soreness and joint pain.

Look for Electra bikes if you prefer to ride with your feet flat on the ground. They employ Flat Foot Technology, a frame design in which the pedals are shifted front. So that you can pedal properly and still put your feet flat on the ground when you want to.

Should you ride a bike with your legs straightened?

On the downward stroke, you don't want your leg to be completely straight, but you also don't want it to be too bent. Try to acquire a 15-20° bend in your knee on the down stroke, as stated in the article above. Or adjust your seat so your heel may extend below the pedal axle. Everything here is a matter of opinion. The most crucial thing is to determine what works for you.

What to Do if You Purchase a Wrong-Sized Bike

 if you carefully review the various bike size charts, you could still choose the incorrect size. You can ask the shop owner to change the bike if you realize it isn't the ideal size. Here are some steps you can take to address the size issue if you are unwilling to give up the bike:

  • If you're having trouble with the force of the pedaling, you can change the saddle of your bicycle to the front or back. To enjoy riding a bike, you need to put yourself in a position where you can provide the necessary force to move the bike at the desired pace. A poorly positioned saddle makes it difficult to ride. You can not take part in a race or other activity that calls for vigorous pedaling.
  • Consider purchasing a longer or shorter stem. It will alter your body's alignment and put you in a better position to pedal.
  • You should purchase a longer seat post since it's important to sit properly so that your legs can move as pleasantly and freely as necessary. Cycling will undoubtedly be quite painful for you if your bike's seat is too high for you and you are a short biker.

Why Bike Size is So Important?

Bicycles aren't extremely difficult to use. They run on pedal power, and you can drive them with handlebars. Pretty basic, right? But a bike size chart is important to ride it comfortably. How well you handle it depends on your body position. And the bike size determines if you positioned yourself perfectly or not. A bike that is too tiny or large to ride might cause different issues.

Back Pain: Any bike, whether a road bike or a mountain bike, needs good posture. Particularly if you're on a road bike, riding a wrong-sized frame will eventually cause lower back pain. A seat post or handlebar adjustment won't make up for the frame.

Fatigue: A right-sized bike will allow you to pedal more effectively. You can acquire the right posture and leg alignment to get the most out of each pedal. You won't exert yourself when the bike fits your size.

Wrist Pain: Your wrists will start to feel the strain of improper placement if you ride a bike that is too big or small for a prolonged period. Your wrists will naturally overcompensate because of the better strain your body posture would cause. Too-large frames will force you to extend your reach when using the handlebars to steer the bike, which is also not ideal.

Higher Crash Risks: You have far better overall control of the bike while riding a proper-sized bike. When you ride a huge bike, you won't be able to control it properly. This can increase the likelihood of a collision.

Finding the ideal bike size involves more considerations than just the frame size. The key to having the perfect setup is finding the appropriate frame size. But you also need the proper saddle, handlebar, and cleat positions to enjoy your bike. Check if your handlebars, cleats, and seat are installed properly.

Conclusion

We genuinely hope that you can comprehend bike sizes with the aid of our blog. Keep in mind that not all bikes will fit according to these sizing charts. Bikes come in a variety of sizes from manufacturers. However, we compiled this information to help you identify what you're looking for. A bike fit is usually a good investment. By investing in a bike fit, you can be confident that you'll obtain the ideal bike and that you'll be properly set up on it, preventing pain, discomfort, and injury. This will make cycling even more fun than it currently is.

Nick
 

This is Nick here! Author of SRO, love to play and review some of the best outdoor sports vehicles. Passionate about bikes,scooter, hoverboard, skateboard. Also take classes on outdoor sporting through some private group. Feel free to drop off any questions and suggestions you might have about the reviews and the blog

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